Love is Blind by Sean Corbett

LOVE IS BLIND:  A TRUE ROMANCE

LoveIsBlindSean Corbett
Outskirts Press (2015)
ISBN 9781478740124
Reviewed by Sheri Hoyte for Reader Views (09/15)

“Love is Blind: A True Romance” by Sean Corbett is the true love story of Grant and Valerie Hyde.  Grant was born prematurely, and as was standard procedure in 1950, was placed in an incubator with pure oxygen, ultimately causing severe vision impairment.  In spite of his deteriorating eyesight, Grant lived as much of a normal life as possible.  Valerie was a girl that seemingly had everything going for her growing up, and was just starting her career in banking, when she was suddenly afflicted with Multiple Sclerosis.

The two first connect over the internet and become fast friends. Then they met each other in person and the rest, as they say, is history. The friendship, love, and mutual respect they have for each other far outweighs the confines of any of their physical limitations. The Hyde’s story will restore your faith in true love, and in soul-mates, and is truly the definition of a long-lasting, successful relationship.

The story would definitely benefit from another round of editing to tighten up the storyline, as it seems to jump around quite a bit.  However, I did feel that the back stories leading up to the actual “love story” provide an extensive history on each person, so when the two actually come together you feel like you’ve known them for years, and that the next natural course of their lives could only be with each other.

I enjoyed “Love is Blind: A True Romance” by Sean Corbett. It is a wonderful story and testament to having an optimistic and wholesome attitude towards life, no matter what cards you are dealt.  This book would be of interest to those with a penchant for true love stories, those interested in learning more about Multiple Sclerosis and blindness, and overcoming obstacles on the journey towards true love and happiness.

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About sviolante

Author of Innocent War www.susanviolante.com
This entry was posted in Memoir/Biography, Non Fiction and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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